Sections

Weather Forecast

Close

Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking arrested, police say

'This is not some tin-pot dictatorship': Comey pushes back against Trump's suggestion he be jailed

James Comey, former director of the FBI, swears in to a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing in Washington on June 8, 2017. Bloomberg photo by Andrew Harrer.

WASHINGTON - Former FBI director James Comey is pushing back against President Donald Trump's suggestion that he should be jailed, saying in a new interview that Trump's pronouncements on Twitter pose a "great danger."

"This is not some tin-pot dictatorship where the leader of the country gets to say, 'The people I don't like go to jail,'" Comey told NPR in the latest in a series of interviews to promote his new book.

In tweets Sunday, April 15, and Monday, April 16, Trump alleged, without citing evidence, that Comey had committed "many crimes" and deserves to be jail for leaking classified information and lying to Congress - allegations Comey denies.

"The big questions in Comey's badly reviewed book aren't answered like, how come he gave up Classified Information (jail), why did he lie to Congress (jail), why did the DNC refuse to give Server to the FBI (why didn't they TAKE it), why the phony memos, McCabe's $700,000 & more?" Trump wrote on Twitter.

Comey, who was fired by Trump last year, told NPR that he doesn't follow Trump on Twitter but sees some of his tweets.

"The president of the United States just said that a private citizen should be jailed," Comey said. "And I think the reaction of most of us was, 'Meh, that's another one of those things.' This is not normal. This is not OK. There's a danger that we will become numb to it, and we will stop noticing the threats to our norms."

The White House and Republican National Committee have launched a widespread campaign to undermine Comey's credibility as he conducts a media blitz to promote his book, "A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership," which is set to be released Tuesday.

Trump has tweeted more a half-dozen times about Comey in recent days, including a retweet Monday night of a post promoting a new RNC website that refers to "Lyin' Comey."

  

Story by John Wagner. Wagner is a national reporter who leads The Post's new breaking political news team. He previously covered the Trump White House. During the 2016 presidential election, he focused on the Democratic campaigns of Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Martin O’Malley. He also chronicled Maryland government for more than a decade.

Advertisement
randomness