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Carson Wentz proposed at a romantic Kentucky castle with intriguing history

Carson Wentz chose this medieval-themed castle in Kentucky as the location for his recent marriage proposal to Madison Oberg. Special to The Forum1 / 3
Carson Wentz announced on Twitter Tuesday, Feb. 6, that he's engaged to Madison "Maddie" Oberg. He proposed at The Kentucky Castle in Versailles, which is just outside of Lexington. Special to The Forum2 / 3
The castle rooftop offers event space for up to 350 guests. Special to The Forum3 / 3

VERSAILLES, Ky.—I know what you're thinking. I can hear the voices, see the comments and envision the eye-rolling and head shaking already.

"Another Carson Wentz story, seriously? About his personal life, nonetheless?"

The answer is yes, and yes. But please, bear with me here.

This story has less to do with Wentz and everything to do with the historic, medieval-themed Kentucky venue in which he recently proposed to his now-fiancee, Madison Oberg, a Kentucky native.

Wentz's proposal, which he announced on both his Instagram and Twitter accounts Feb. 6, featured four stunning images that laid out a perfect sequence of the proposal from start to finish.

First, there's Wentz dropping to a knee. Then, two photos showing Wentz and Oberg embracing after Wentz presumingly "popped the question." And to end the sequence, a photo of Oberg showing off her shiny, newly acquired engagement ring.

Carson Wentz announced on Twitter Tuesday, Feb. 6, that he's engaged to Madison "Maddie" Oberg.

Oh yeah, and what about that castle-looking monstrosity in the background?

That would be The Kentucky Castle, or the Martin Castle, or the Castle Post, or the Versailles Castle. Yeah, it's a little confusing, I know. If the castle were a relationship status, "complicated" would be most-fitting. Let me explain.

The castle was recently named "The Most Beautiful Hotel in Kentucky" by Architectural Digest, a monthly magazine specializing in international design talents, innovative homes and decorating ideas. It was also recently crowned the No. 1 restaurant in Kentucky to try in 2018 by an online blog as well as the No. 1 most-romantic restaurant in the state of Kentucky, according to Reader's Digest.

In other words, the place is quite lovely.

But what the medieval-style castle has evolved into recent years was never the vision of the original owner, Rex Martin.

As the story goes, Martin and his wife Caroline returned from a trip to Germany in 1969 and were inspired by the architecture they had seen while traveling through Europe.

Wanting a castle-type home themselves, the Martins settled upon a 53-acre horse farm in a rural patch of north central Kentucky and began construction on "Martin's Castle" that same year. Construction moved at a snail's pace, much to the chagrin of Martin's wife, Caroline. As Martin's vision for the castle kept growing larger, and larger, Caroline began to get frustrated.

The castle was still unfinished when the Martins filed for divorce in 1975. "Castle acreage" was reportedly mentioned as part of their troubles in divorce papers.

In 1988, Martin put his completed castle on the market. Beyond tourists passing by to snap a photo of the castle, the home drew little to no interest among buyers. The castle sat vacant for more than 30 years. Calls to a phone number left on a sign went unanswered. Martin abandoned his castle and died before the castle was sold to Miami real estate investor Tom Post in 2003 for $1.8 million.

Post immediately began dumping massive amounts of money into castle renovations and changed the name from "Martin's Castle" to "The Castle Post."

The castle was originally built as a home but is now a high-end boutique hotel and event venue. Special to The Forum

But on May 10, 2004, after months of ongoing renovations, newly installed woodwork and wiring caught fire in the main building. Post, who was at his Miami home at the time, was forced to start over. Post's original vision of making the castle his vacation home went up in smoke, so he decided the second time around to renovate the castle into a luxury bed and breakfast.

The 16-bedroom hotel was completed in 2008. Post's additions to the castle included a library, game room, dining hall, ballroom, tennis court and swimming pool, among other amenities. It was luxurious, elegant, and, for all intents and purposes, picture perfect.

In 2010, just two years after its reconstruction, Post listed the property for a staggering $30 million. At that price tag, The Castle Post drew no interest from potential buyers.

Seven years later, in 2017, Post finally found a long-awaited buyer for The Castle Post, but at a much lower price.

On July 21, 2017, a group of local investors purchased the property for $8.7 million, according to a report in the Lexington Herald-Leader. New ownership has since renamed it "The Kentucky Castle," which is what it is known as today.

Today, the castle is absolutely breathtaking. A trip to the castle's website features endless photos showcasing the hotel's stellar inner and outer beauty.

The castle rooftop offers event space for up to 350 guests. Special to The Forum

The castle now serves as a high-end boutique hotel and event venue. Its rooftop alone can serve as an event space for up to 350 guests. With more than 50 acres surrounding the castle, they've even begun to grow their own food, and, as previously mentioned, the medieval oasis boasts the most romantic restaurant in the entire state, a farm-to-table restaurant.

It's no wonder why any couple would choose The Kentucky Castle to celebrate the beginning of the rest of their lives.

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