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TigerSwan to offer settlement after ND board's attorney calls previous proposals insufficient

Attorney Lynn Boughey, right, speaks to the North Dakota Private Investigation and Security Board next to his client, TigerSwan Vice President Wesley Fricks, Tuesday, May 15, 2018 in Mandan. John Hageman / Forum News Service1 / 2
Attorney Monte Rogneby listens during a meeting of the North Dakota Private Investigation and Security Board Tuesday, May 15, 2018 in Mandan. John Hageman / Forum News Service 2 / 2

MANDAN, N.D. — TigerSwan will offer another settlement proposal to the North Dakota board that accused the security firm of operating here without a license during the Dakota Access Pipeline protests.

The two sides came face to face during the Tuesday, May 15, meeting of the Private Investigation and Security Board, which sued the North Carolina-based firm nearly a year ago. The case is scheduled to go to trial in October, but TigerSwan's attorney Lynn Boughey agreed to send the board a settlement offer.

While TigerSwan isn't willing to admit wrongdoing, it would discuss paying a fine, Boughey said. It's also seeking to have its North Dakota license approved because a denial can be used against it in other states, he said.

The PISB attorney, Monte Rogneby, said TigerSwan's previous settlement proposals haven't been "acceptable" to the board and noted that "not every case settles."

"I think the board would like to find a commonsense resolution to this case that protects the public, which is what the board's obligation is," he said.

Boughey was allowed to address the board after it met behind closed doors to discuss the case. He was joined by TigerSwan Vice President Wesley Fricks, who was hopeful about the prospects for settling the dispute despite Boughey's exasperation over disagreements between the two sides.

"Hopefully we can come to an agreement," Fricks said after the meeting.

TigerSwan argues it didn't provide private security or investigative services in North Dakota as defined by state law, which the board disputes.

A North Dakota judge has dismissed one of three counts against TigerSwan, prompting the firm to seek the dismissal of the other two. Providing private security or investigative services in North Dakota without a license is a Class B misdemeanor.

TigerSwan was hired by Energy Transfer Partners, the company behind the $3.8 billion oil pipeline that sparked months of protests south of Mandan.

John Hageman

John Hageman covers North Dakota politics from the Forum News Service bureau in Bismarck. He attended the University of Minnesota in the Twin Cities, where he studied journalism and political science, and he previously worked at the Grand Forks Herald and Bemidji Pioneer.  

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